Circuits for Hobbyists - a Collection of Schematics to Build

How do you become better at electronics? By building lots of circuits.

On this page, you'll find circuit diagrams for a wide range of fun and interesting electronic circuits:

Transistor circuits. 555 Timer Circuits. LED Circuits. Amplifier circuits. And many more.

All circuits come with a component list and a connection diagram, schematic, or build instruction. So you can just start building right away.

If you have any questions about the circuits, just ask in the comment section of the circuit you're curious about.


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The Sunrise Wake-Up Alarm

In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to build an sunrise wake-up alarm. It’s a light-sensitive circuit that will activate a buzzer when you have light shining directly on it. Place it in your window at night and the alarm will activate in the morning when the sun rises.

How To Build An Automatic Night-Light

In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to build an automatic night-light that turns on when it gets dark. It’s a simple circuit that you can build on a breadboard. This circuit shows you how to do it with an LED. But you can use the same principle to turn on bigger and brighter lights too. […]

Simple VU-Meter Circuit

I put together this Voltage Unit (VU) meter using LEDs on a breadboard the other day. It only has 4 LEDs, but can easily be expanded to more: It’s basically a simple display for showing a value. It’s originally for showing signal level in audio circuits, but there’s no reason you can’t use it to […]

Build Instructions: The Blinking Light Circuit

Do you want to build a circuit that blinks a light? This inverter-based circuit is simple, and it’s small enough to fit on a breadboard. The circuit uses standard basic electronic components and you can build it even if you have never built anything before. Check out the full build instructions in the video below: […]

What Is an H-Bridge?

An H-bridge is a simple circuit that lets you control a DC motor to go backward or forward. You normally use it with a microcontroller, such as an Arduino, to control motors. When you can control two motors to go either forward or backward – you can build yourself a robot!